Tag: U.S.A.

This Fourth

In 2020 as Americans yet again we are extra-engaged in reflecting upon what we were and what we are, what we believe, whether we really act on what we state we believe, and how we may put such beliefs into better practice.

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After Eight Years Of Quiet…

I’ve written before that this is not a politics site and that I will not push my personal political opinions at you. You don’t care about what I think and I don’t blame you. My views aren’t important. However, sometimes politics must come up when addressing certain issues. And it may be unavoidable to touch…

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Inauguration Day (30 April 1789)

Recently elected President George Washington – the first president under the then just ratified Constitution (under which the U.S. government still operates) – delivered his inaugural address in New York City on April 30, 1789. The text is eight – that’s right, only eight – pages long and is in his handwriting. Held at the…

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History: Unfollowed

Ah, Monday morning: And less than two weeks before the inauguration of a new U.S. president who has not exactly charmed half the people in the country, we need this? Yesterday, History on Instagram shared some “history” with us. Good grief. First, nothing in that History Insta-caption above is outright false. However, it is an…

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As Decided In Philadelphia

Well, my absentee ballot has arrived here in Britain. The election is almost upon us. I vote in New York state, in the 19th congressional district, which is located upstate partly in the Catskills where our house is: Let me offer a quick explanation of that ballot because this fact might baffle some people. The…

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Living With A Legacy

Emma has returned from a summer in Charleston, South Carolina. She has written various posts detailing how she’d had a wonderful time. We’ve been there, too; Charleston is definitely a gorgeous city. Now, she tackles THAT question: I think this is one of the things I’ve heard the most when I was in the U.S.…

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That Wide Ocean

America’s top official in France from 1785-1789, forty-something Thomas Jefferson, came to believe U.S. diplomats should not be overseas more than about eight years at a stretch. He felt if they (and they were then only men) were, they would lose touch with events and opinions at home. As a result, they would eventually be…

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