Arriving From Abroad, And Seeing The Oscars

[Waves.] Hello from upstate New York – about three hours’ drive north of Manhattan – in the Catskills. We’ve made it!:

Windham Mountain ski resort (about 5 miles away), left. Hunter Mountain (about 15 miles away), right. Taken from our house earlier just around sun up. It's nearly all "artificial" snow. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Windham Mountain ski resort (about 5 miles away), left. Hunter Mountain (about 15 miles away), right. Taken from our house earlier just around sun up. It’s nearly all “artificial” snow. [Photo by me, 2016.]
And what a strange winter this is: last day of February and there’s almost no snow. And I mean NONE. Natural snow has been so rare since December, the ski resorts have all had to rely mostly on the “man-made” variety.

The trip was fine. We had a good flight from London. Got the rental car at Newark Airport no problem.

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Am I “Feared” Like J.K. Rowling?

Scrolling Twitter briefly last night, I happened to see a tweet from someone I follow, and who follows me back. It was harmless stuff about a Fox News host. Vaguely wanting to see if the host had responded, I clicked on the name of that relatively well-known news personality who had been @’d in the tweet.

When I did, I discovered that that Fox news woman had “blocked” me. I couldn’t see her timeline at all. I sat there bemused because I had not the slightest idea why.

Screen capture of Twitter "Support" page.
Screen capture of Twitter “Support” page.

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“America? Nope, never heard of it.”

Recently, the BBC was out and about, questioning people in London, India, and Singapore:

Screen capture of the BBC web site.
Screen capture of the BBC web site.

A practical point: the BBC’s social media linkage there is useless. I can’t see how to link directly to that update (for your ease in accessing it). The “Share” facility for some dopey reason takes one only to the entire page, thus requiring a reader to scroll down through over two days of other posts to get to it.

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Land Of The Free, Home Of The Sweatpants

What one learns. Did you know that dressing like a rumpled mess is a sign of “freedom” and a declaration of one’s “Americanness?” Neither did I until now:

Screen capture of Time.
Screen capture of Time.

The writer states she doesn’t see dressing “casual” as being the opposite of “formal.” Rather, it’s the opposite of “confined.” She also asserts:

To dress casual is quintessentially to dress as an American and to live, or to dream of living, fast and loose and carefree.

Observing that is supposed to be, presumably, suitably – no pun intended – patriotic?

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Spinning Out Of Control

I’m sure some of you reading this were born in the late 1980s and 1990s. The era of which I write about in the novels is therefore in a real sense “history” to you. It pre-dates either your consciousness of the wider world…. or even your birth itself!😉

Strasbourg, France. Home of the European Parliament. [Photo by me, 1996.]
Strasbourg, France. Home of the European Parliament. [Photo by me, 1996.]

It’s trite to point out that one can’t hope to begin to understand the present without understanding the past; yet it’s absolutely true. And trying to appreciate the human outlook of any “past” is a vital aspect of that effort. This article in Die Zeit about Germany’s attitude and approach to the world since 1989 could in large measure apply elsewhere in Europe as well as to the U.S.A.:

A quarter of a century after the fall of the Berlin Wall … we’ve woken up and it feels like a bad dream….

….Crisis has become the new normal. The years between 1990 and now were the exception.

The psychological repercussions of this fundamentally new situation on Europe’s political elites are both brutal and curious at the same time. Those aged 45 to 65 currently in positions of power have only known growing prosperity, freedom and cultural sophistication. They were, and to a large extent still are, predisposed to exert themselves only modestly, act responsibly and expect that they could enjoy the fruits of their labor. And suddenly history has unceremoniously grabbed them by the scruff of the neck. Do we really need to fight now? More than ever? And what does our cardiologist have to say?

I’m sharing that article and writing this post because that piece hit me hard. I fall into the “early part” of that age group; but I was certainly not “powerful” in 1989. (Nor am I now!) Speaking here only for myself, of course, I also vividly recall the post-fall of the Berlin Wall atmosphere: it fills my novels and is meant to do so.

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Coming Tomorrow!

Happy Sunday. I’m having a rest today. So no profound, thought-provoking travel, expat or literary blog post. Sorry.

While “relaxing,” I should finish The Winds of War…. TODAY!

I merely want here to offer a coming attraction:

Free Stock Photo: Illustration of a megaphone and announcement text.
Free Stock Photo: Illustration of a megaphone and announcement text.

I want to invite you. While certainly in line with what this blog revolves around overall, tomorrow – on Monday at 8 am UK time/ 3 am ET US – I’ll share a post that is rather different. Here’s my only hint:

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No Plans To Evacuate (At This Time)

In 2006, the U.S. State Department helped organize a mass evacuation of U.S. citizens from Lebanon during the Hezbollah-Israel war. However, currently, there seems no similar urgency on the part of the U.S. to evacuate a far smaller number of U.S. citizens from Yemen. Lawsuits have even been filed challenging the government’s not doing so.

As of April 11, this is what the Department of State has to say:

Yemen Crisis Update, April 11, 2015
Yemen Crisis Update, April 11, 2015

The page continues in sharing how Americans can perhaps leave courtesy of “third party” assistance, such as India’s:

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Our Warmest (And Coolest) Feelings: 25 Countries

USA Today tweeted this yesterday:

USA Today screen capture.
USA Today screen capture.

I enjoy polls such as that one. And that one makes for something of a change too. Usually it’s about who hates us.😉

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And Something About Llamas?

While I was working yesterday, I did what I normally do: I had Twitter open to the side on my iPad. I check it occasionally. Usually I do so when I stop for a writing break, but sometimes I just glance over at it.

That latter is a bad habit.

What a strange “social media” day yesterday was (to me, anyway).

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“And where are you from?”

On our way out of church this morning, the priest asked me, “And where are you from?”

He may merely have been asking where I was from in the U.K. It wasn’t our “regular” church. Nonetheless, I was startled.

I thought: Gee, do I look like I’m not from here? I’m sure, to some extent, I don’t.

As we shook hands, I replied, “I’m from New York originally.”

The look on his face indicated that answer was a surprise. I suppose he had indeed figured I was going to say Bristol or something.

But I often don’t know how to answer that question. I was born in New York City, and when asked where I’m from that’s my initial answer. I grew up on Long Island, in Suffolk County; but most Europeans haven’t a clue where Suffolk County is, and they usually associate “Long Island” either with the Hamptons or The Great Gatsby. And, here in England, there is a Suffolk county too – the “original” Suffolk, of course.

US Embassy London on Google. It's closed today, Sunday.
US Embassy London on Google. It’s closed today, Sunday.

I’ve also spent much more of my adult life outside of the U.S. than inside of it. But I always feel American, and like a New Yorker. And I even still feel like a Long Islander – even though I have for years had no ties to Long Island whatsoever.

I don’t think I’ll ever not feel that way. We can move wherever in the world, but is where we are born and reared imprinted on us for life? Seems so.

Just a little “quiet reflection.” Hope you’re having a good Sunday.🙂