Lisbon, Portugal

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I should be writing, I know that. I have a novel that is now “overdue.” And I am working on it afternoons in the hotel.

But this is just too much to resist and remain locked away all day. We are here only until Sunday. Thursday and Friday, I was out and about at this “secret” destination – which you knew already if you follow my Instagram. And obviously this post’s title gives it away: Lisbon, Portugal:

I even got in a required selfie:

And, as you know, give me history – including royalty…

Snapped this earlier today.📸😎 . Wikipedia: "Catherine of Braganza (Portuguese: Catarina de Bragança; 25 November 1638 – 31 December 1705) was Queen of England, Scotland and Ireland from 1662 to 1685, by marriage to King Charles II. She also served as regent of Portugal during the absence of her brother in 1701 and 1704-05, after her return to Portugal as widow…" . And there "she" is, in statue, looking out across the Tagus and at Vasco da Gama bridge.👑 . A bit of history of tonight. #Goodnight, wherever you are.🌃 . #tourism #travel #statue #art #history #CatherineofBraganza #Lisbon #Lisboa #Portugal #England #vascodagamabridge #Scotland #Ireland #Europe #royalty #photo #photography #authors #writers #writersofinstagram #authorsofinstagram #walking

A post shared by R. J. Nello (@rjnello) on

And an “old town”…

And I’ve had it.

By the way, there’s serious modernity hereabouts, too:

Lisbon has struck me as a manageable capital. It’s not a “mega-tourist-city” like London, Paris or Rome. But it is endlessly fascinating, not “overwhelming,” and well-worth a visit.

I just wish I spoke a bit more Portuguese. I know about five words. English is not uncommon – for instance, the Metro has signage in Portuguese and English, and the ticket seller we encountered spoke fluent English – and while knowing some Spanish is certainly useful, Portuguese is definitely NOT Spanish.

Had a laugh last night with an older taxi driver who did not speak English. Approaching our hotel, which he was having trouble finding, when I saw it I idiotically and thoughtlessly burst into French: “Ici!”

When I realized how ridiculous that sounded, I pointed and said, “Aqui.” Here: in both Portuguese and Spanish – but trust me, I was not thinking of it as Portuguese in saying it.

He responded with that “universal” word: “Okay.”

Bom dia (Good day) wherever you are in the world. 🙂

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