Merci, Fashionistas

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As bloggers we try to anticipate our audience, but one never can know for sure what is going to catch “fire.” Every post I write is composed allowing for the possibility the entire world could see it. This is the internet: you never know…

One post back in mid-September was written much like any other. I thought I would touch on a few matters about 18th century fashion that had come up in conversation casually between myself and visiting friends from America a day or so before, and how it related to Conventions (my current manuscript). I figured it might attract a few likes and maybe a comment or two, and that would be that. Next.

Screen capture of the opening to the "What Was Fashionable" post.
Screen capture of the opening to the “What Was Fashionable” post.

Within hours, wow, did I get a shock!

It is now by far my most “liked” post of all time – in only a month and a half. It still attracts so many daily visitors it is regularly one of my most read posts each day. When I clicked “Publish” I had never imagined it had that potential.

A large part of that is because it introduced me to many of you who hadn’t known I existed. It brought me a small avalanche of new followers within days, and even now it continues to attract “likes” and new followers. Who could have thought so many would be so interested in late 1700s fashion in France and England?

Prior to that post, I had known that some long-time followers were fashion bloggers. I had even joked about that in the post – and about my being a man. However, the huge number of visits and “likes” and new followers it generated from so many more “fashionistas” happily confirmed something for me as a writer: many of you are indeed extremely interested in that topic! ๐Ÿ™‚

Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.
Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.
Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.
Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.
Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.
Sneak Peek into Conventions. Click to Enlarge.

Silhouette of a “fashionable” American woman, probably made when she was about age 28, in 1776. The only known reproduction of her:

Author Unknown. Exact date unknown. Martha Jefferson (1748-1782), wife of Thomas Jefferson from 1772-1782. [Wikipedia. Public Domain.]
Author Unknown. Exact date unknown. Martha Jefferson (1748-1782), wife of Thomas Jefferson from 1772-1782. [Wikipedia. Public Domain.]

Probably much like you face if you blog, I can’t follow back everyone who follows me. I wouldn’t have time to read everything and even hope to get any writing of my own done. But I do stop by EVERY blog of ANYONE new who follows, or “likes” one of my posts, and/or comments on one. We do benefit greatly from what we learn from each other.

Merci beaucoup! Thank you! I’m back now to writing more about “1787-1795.” ๐Ÿ™‚

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