Wandering The Grounds Of Knebworth House

We took another long walk yesterday…

Public Footpath sign. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Public Footpath sign. [Photo by me, 2016.]
You never know what you’ll see if you look closely:

A wild poppy. [Photo by me, 2016.]
A wild poppy. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Although some sights are too big to miss:

An oak tree of advanced age. [Photo by me, 2016.]
An oak tree of advanced age. [Photo by me, 2016.]

And what we leave behind to remember:

Memorial to a loved one. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Memorial to a loved one. [Photo by me, 2016.]

It bears a remarkable tribute:

Inscription. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Inscription. [Photo by me, 2016.]

And you can see it from quite far away:

Memorial from a distance. [Photo by me, 2016.]
Memorial from a distance. [Photo by me, 2016.]

That 19th century monument was dedicated by author/playwright and politician Edward Bulwer-Lytton, to his late mother.

According to Wikipedia, she totally disapproved of the woman (an “Irish beauty”) he planned to marry, so she had cut off his “allowance,” thus forcing him actually to have to work.

And she may have not been entirely wrong in her stance given the marriage did turn out to be a disaster: his infidelity and their separation; the estranged wife turning to writing too and producing a satirical novel clearly about him; following him around on the campaign trail denouncing him; he cutting off her “allowance” and access to their children, threatening her publisher, and even having her committed to a “mental asylum” briefly.

All rather Victorian novel-like itself, one supposes.

It’s located within the grounds of Knebworth House:

Knebworth House, Knebworth, Hertfordshire. Photo by me, 2016.]
Knebworth House, Knebworth, Hertfordshire. [Photo by me, 2016.]

The house is off the A1(M) motorway just north of London (and within rambling distance of our new place). Novelist Edward is by far its most famous resident. (It’s still privately owned, but obviously open to the public: his great-great-great grandson lives in it now.) Wikipedia also tells us:

He coined the phrases “the great unwashed”, “pursuit of the almighty dollar”, “the pen is mightier than the sword”, “dweller on the threshold”, as well as the well-known opening line “It was a dark and stormy night”.

We didn’t go inside the house, but will on a future visit. Regardless, days out like those always provides inspiration. I got home with some new ideas for several of the English characters bouncing around in my head. πŸ˜‰

Have a good Monday, wherever you are. πŸ™‚

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