R. J. Nello

๐Ÿ‡บ๐Ÿ‡ธ-born, ๐Ÿ‡ฌ๐Ÿ‡ง-based, novelist.๐Ÿ“– Writing, travel, culture and more. Always holding "auditions" – so be careful or you may end up a character in โ€œ1797โ€…and perhaps an evil one.๐ŸŽญ (And why do I suspect some of you might like that latter in particular?)๐Ÿ˜‚

Sailing Away

July 1, 2016
R. J. Nello

I’m not a sailor. However, sailing ships of the 18th and 19th centuries have long interested me. Here are some “old” photos at Mystic Seaport, in Connecticut, from back in 2000, at the Charles W. Morgan:

At the helm of the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

At the helm of the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

Before I go on. Don’t ask about the glasses, please. That was 16 years ago.

Looking out on Long Island Sound from the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by me.]

Looking out on Long Island Sound from the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by me.]

Aboard the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

Aboard the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

At the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

At the Charles W. Morgan, Mystic, Connecticut, April 2000. [Photo by Mrs. Nello.]

Some dreaded “history” briefly. ๐Ÿ˜‰ Thomas Jefferson crossed the Atlantic twice in his life: in 1784 and in 1789. He also took a separate interim journey to England while based in France.

In speeches and letters, he was fond of nautical metaphors. (“We shall put her on her republican tack…”) Yet he was never happy at sea. When asked to consider returning to France, he made it quite plain there was no way he would cross the Atlantic ever again.

For Conventions, I’ve been reading up on sail in the 18th century. Nowadays, we get huffy over a 2 hour airport delay, some misplaced luggage, or waiting at security for “30 minutes.” Of course that’s nothing compared to how slow, uncomfortable, often seriously sea-sickening, and even deadly, it could be to travel by sail between Europe and America in, say, 1785.

On that, uh, pleasant historical comparative note, have a good weekend, wherever you are. ๐Ÿ™‚

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