Trapped In “Interesting Times”

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I mentioned it yesterday. I’m sure you’ve heard in recent days about the June 23 referendum in which 52 percent of U.K. voters chose to withdraw the United Kingdom from the European Union. It has been a controversial choice on those voters’ parts to say the least.

The British losing minority is furious. European Union officialdom is irate. European heads of government are – if not publicly, likely privately – angry. And it seems onlookers in much of the rest of the world are baffled.

The "Big Ben" clock at the Palace of Westminster, London. [Photo by me, 1996.]
The “Big Ben” clock at the Palace of Westminster, London. [Photo by me, 1996.]
A majority of its voters having made their wish known, the United Kingdom is, for the moment, essentially “a pariah state.” This is now “the new normal.” It will likely last for some time to come.

Whether we agreed with the poll outcome or not, as Americans we should sympathize and support our ally’s choice. Our Declaration of Independence (from this now very ally) in July 1776 threw our country and Atlantic world into immediate political and economic turmoil, and opened the door to a wildly uncertain, “unplanned for,” future. Similarly the massive, unpredictable, fallout of the U.K.’s EU “leave” vote will dominate the country’s, and region’s, political and economic landscape for years to come and refashion both, whether we like it or not. The deed is done.

All that in the last few days also got me thinking again about how divisive politics is always with us. Yes, we may try to avoid it, but we usually can’t entirely. It pops up even amongst our friends and family too, of course:

Excerpt from "Distances," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Distances,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Distances," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Distances,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Distances," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Distances,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Thomas Jefferson's home, Monticello, Virginia. [Photo by me, 2011.]
Thomas Jefferson’s home, Monticello, Virginia. [Photo by me, 2011.]
Excerpt from "Passports," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Passports,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Distances," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Distances,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Frontiers," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Frontiers,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
George Washington's grave at his home, Mt. Vernon, Virginia. [Photo by me, 2011.]
George Washington’s grave at his home, Mt. Vernon, Virginia. [Photo by me, 2011.]
Excerpt from "Distances," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Distances,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Passports," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Passports,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from "Passports," on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.
Excerpt from “Passports,” on the iPad app for Kindle. Click to expand.

If only it were all always just “blah, blah, blah.”

I hate living in “interesting times.” I’d rather read about someone else’s “interesting times.” However, we must accept the life challenges fate assigns us.

Have a good day, wherever you are in our world. 🙂

3 comments

  1. In reference to preferring to read about past “interesting times,” we must remember that all journalists, memoirists, historians and novelists cherry-pick the facts to fit their agendas. Without their doing so, there would be little more than lists of names, places and dates to read (novelists who rely heavily on using lengthy factual treatises for their expository passages may fail to keep readers’ attention). I often consult historical timelines, but I’m glad that all of the “interesting times” are not confined to my ancestors’ lives.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Quite true. I wouldn’t want to be bored either. I suppose there just has to be some “interesting times” balance out there – as if there are just so many “interesting” things I can deal with on a daily basis. 😉

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