The Old-Fashioned Mail

I know this has been received in the old-fashioned mail. So I may now post it here in no danger of the recipient seeing it on the net BEFORE having received it:

The old-fashioned way. [Photo by me, 2015.]
The old-fashioned way. [Photo by me, 2015.]

Remember when birthdays meant actually remembering them and not having a reminder pop up?

I did get a Facebook reminder of that birthday. However, by then the card had to be in the mail for days. It takes a minimum of 5 days to get to the U.S.

In thinking on that and writing this post, I’m again remembering those days when we wrote LETTERS:

Gather ’round, young people, and I will share a small memory of decades ago. There was once a time teens and young adults wrote letters, usually long-hand, and on paper, to each other in distant lands….

Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, etc., and so on. We’re used to immediacy and even expect it.

For those of us who remember using “the mail” to write actual letters on paper, using pens and ink, the mail seems maddeningly “slow” nowadays by comparison, doesn’t it? And it should, because it is.

To those of you who’ve never experienced what writing an actual letter is like, and as well as how it feels to receive one, well, it did happen regularly in ye olden days. 😉

Have a good Friday! 🙂

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Author: “Conventions: The Garden At Paris,” “Passports,” “Frontiers,” and “Distances.” British Airways frequent flier. Lover of the Catskill Mountains...and the 1700s. New novel of 1797-1805, "Tomorrow The Grace," due out in 2019.